10-Minute Valentine's Mousse | The Geneva Convention: 10-Minute Valentine's Mousse

Thursday, February 13, 2014

10-Minute Valentine's Mousse

I can't take much, if any credit for this recipe. It all goes to James's parents, who made it for us when I visited them last month. James and I had made the night's dinner, but neglected to make a dessert. Fortunately, as its name suggests, this mousse came to the rescue without much longer than the normal pause between two courses.

This is the easiest dessert recipe I have ever encountered, unless you see filling a bowl with Lindt truffles as a dessert recipe (which I will admit to having done before). Like Lindt truffles, it produces a deliciously creamy, chocolatey treat. Unlike Lindt truffles, it is tangy, relatively inexpensive to whip up, and perfect for Valentine's Day because it requires two people to do it right.*


I know some people who hate to let anyone else into the kitchen with them, but personally I enjoy cook with my loved ones. And this is a good recipe to start with because it's so easy -- in its simplest incarnation, it requires only three ingredients.

Ingredients:
Heaping 1/2 cup chocolate chips (I use Ghirardelli 60% Cacao)
1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
1/2 cup plain, non-fat yogurt
Optional:
Splash of coffee and vanilla, or any fruit-flavored liqueur

Hardware:
Instrument of choice for whipping cream
A candy thermometer

Notes:
1. Melt the chocolate to 130 degrees Fahrenheit in a microwave or double boiler. This will take several minutes.** (I have found that this recipe will work well between 120 and 140, but 130 is the sweet spot. See the ** below.)
2. While one chef is melting the chocolate, the other should whip the cream. (We typically use a bullet blender.)
3. Combine the whipped cream with the yogurt, and any optional flavorings.
4. When the chocolate is heated to the proper temperature, slowly drizzle it into the yogurt and cream mixture while the other person holds the bowl and whisks furiously until the mousse is smooth and uniform. A hand mixer is also acceptable here.
5. If you used a handmixer for step 4, your mousse will probably be the right consistency right off the bat. If you used a whisk, you might want to let it chill for a couple minutes in the fridge in order to get it to a mousse-ier consistency.


Enjoy!


*Theoretically you could make this recipe alone, but I never have. It would require some creativity, I think.
** The more methodical of the two chefs is usually best suited to the job of melting the chocolate. I say this because James is far better at it than I am -- it never ends up at quite the right temperature when I do it!

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